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Erica’s Favorite Rockstops

Endpin slipping? Here are Erica’s favorite rockstops.

Remember when you got your supply list when first starting to play the cello? Did you wonder what a rockstop was and why you needed one? A rockstop, whatever you call it – an endpin rest, an endpin anchor, an endpin holder – is designed to keep your endpin from slipping. They are used by cellists and double bassists. When I was a kid, there were very few options – all of them black, most of them ineffective unless they were wet and/or on a completely clean floor.

Today cellists have many more options in a variety of colors. Here are some of my favorites.

Erica’s Rockstop Picks

 

Rockstops in the Video

SmartStop

The SmartStop rockstops are new to me. They have great grip and multiple holes so that you can choose the exact endpin placement you want. In addition, they come in a variety of sparkly and matte colors. There’s even one in the shape of a dinosaur! Other colors and designs include antique copper, black, bee hive, sparkly pink, pearl, green, blue, and purple.

After using black rockstops for years, I have to say I am loving the colors!

Dycem Black Hole

The Dycem Black Hole has great grip, one central hole, and comes in black.

Xeros Endpin Anchor (strap)

Though I prefer rockstops, the Xeros Endpin Anchor is good to have when you have a super slick floor. It is available in black or white (as shown in the video).

Emergency Homemade Rockstop

Erica's Homemade Rockstop

I made this rockstop for my water jug cello, which has its own challenges as it has an axe-handle endpin. (See the water jug cello in this video.) The rockstop is made of a PVC snap-in floor drain (about $2.50 – price varies by location – mine was $2.28), and a piece of paracord.

Your Turn

There are many more great choices out there. What’s your favorite?



Please note that some links in this review are affiliate links. For full details, please see our footer below. Thanks for your support!

In addition, the Cello Museum was sent two SmartStop rockstops to review. However, this has had no influence on my evaluation. This review is an honest reflection of my opinions and experiences with the rockstops.

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